800 Eastowne Dr., Ste. 105,
Chapel Hill, NC 27514
September 2012-CBCAP Learning Call: The Missouri Story: Better Community Collaboration, Better Prevention of Child Maltreatment


In this Peer Learning Webinar, CBCAP Lead Agencies hear about the key components of the Missouri Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention Collaborative Model.

Presenters:

•Ken Bopp, PhD, Clinical Professor; University of Missouri - Columbia, School of Medicine

•Bill Holcomb, PhD, MBA; President and CEO of Behavioral Health Concepts, Inc.

•Jamie Myers, M.Ed., LPC, NCC, MACSAPP; Executive Director, Prevention Consultants of Missouri

  


Handouts

icon Missouri Presentation

icon Ken Bopp Handout 

 
Questions that were not answered during the webinar due to time constraints:
 

Q.  In small rural counties what would be the first steps in looking at a CBCAP?

A.  The critical foundation for the Missouri CBCAP sites is the establishment of an organizational infrastructure for the collaborative. The Missouri Children’s Trust Foundation requires each CBCAP collaborative to start by establishing an infrastructure and infrastructure management capabilities comprised of: 1) an administrative-base that can serve as a fiscal agent and establish a governance board/advisory board for the CBCAP; 2) a full-time project facilitator (orchestrator) to mobilize community-based agencies and professionals and engage them in building and maintaining a community-based provider network; 3) collaborative mechanisms, processes, and procedures to enable provider network member organizations/professionals to work in self-directed teams in delivering coordinated services to CBCAP families; and 4) relationships and trust building that enables the leveraging of community-based learning and service capabilities across the network to promote child and family well-being and prevent child abuse and neglect.

 

Q.  Our program here in Iowa is the Family Team Meetings. However, as DHS does a version of this system involved families there is often a stigma attached with the process and it can at times be seen as a precursor to having your children removed from the home. How do you effectively market to non-system engaged families and overcome perceptions of negativity if this occurs in Missouri?

 

A.  First, a critical foundation for the Missouri CBCAP sites is the establishment of a community-based organizational infrastructure for the collaborative. The Missouri Children’s Trust Foundation requires each CBCAP collaborative to establish an infrastructure and infrastructure management capability comprised of: 1) an administrative-base that can serve as a fiscal agent and establish a governance board/advisory board for the CBCAP; 2) a full-time project facilitator (orchestrator) to mobilize community-based agencies and professionals and engage them in building and maintaining a community-based provider network; 3) collaborative mechanisms, processes, and procedures to enable provider network member organizations/professionals to work in self-directed teams in delivering coordinated services to CBCAP families; and 4) relationships and trust building that enables the leveraging of community-based learning and capabilities across the network to promote child and family well-being and prevent child abuse and neglect.

 

Although the DSS Children’s Service is a member of the CBCAP provider network and representatives of Children’s Service regularly participate in provider network meeting and refer families that are not currently active Children’s Service cases to the CBCAP collaborative; the other 25-40 other community-based organizational members of the greatly diminish the stigma. Most of the referrals to the to the CBCAP come from community-based member organizations with clients with multiple issues that member organization’s deem that they need the help of other network organization to help these families reduce their risk and build protective factors and resiliency.

 

Q.  Where did the population come from for the study and was the control group offered or receive any services?

A.  The population for our randomized control trial came from our 1st generation 6 CBCAP sites. Two of these CBCAP sites were located in the St. Louis Metropolitan area – Benton Park West CBCAP a 32 block neighborhood in the St. Louis Inner City the other CBCAP site was comprised of two small cities Maplewood-Richmond Heights that are adjacent to St. Louis City’s western City limits. Two other sites were in rural counties with moderate sized cities Boone County CBCAP (Columbia) in central Missouri and Phelps County CBCAP (Rolla) in south-central Missouri. Finally, there were two very rural sites with small towns -- Barceda CBCAP comprised of 3 counties in southwest Missouri and Washington County in southeast Missouri.

Regarding the second part of your question, those families that were randomly assigned to the control group did not receive coordinated services (e.g., Lead agency inter-organizational/inter-professional collaboration framework that includes personalized, self-directed family support teams; and Personalized course of action (PCA) processes for engaging and working with families). Families assigned to the control group were given a listing or directory of community services and resources and navigate their community’s fragmented and siloed services and resources as they had before the CBCAP was established.

 

Q.  How are you tying the outcomes of these meetings to protective factors?

A.  During FY 2010-2011 the year 3 and year 1 CBCAP sites agreed to begin explicitly identified the interventions, even though some of the interventions reflect some combination of reducing risk factors and promoting family/child “protective factors” and using standardized measures to gather data and document the CBCAPs’ outcomes in building “family/child protective factors” -- parental resilience, social connections, knowledge of parenting and child development, support in times of need, and social and emotional competence of children. The use of the addition monitoring and measurement tools to gather data will begin in FY 2011-2012. These data will be gathered by the four CBCAP sites to assess identified interventions to build family/child protective factors to assess whether or not the chosen interventions are successful in building protective factors in CBCAP families and their children as well as identify other modifiable determinants of family/child positive well-being in order to know how to intervene more effectively.

Appendix 4:

Identifying Interventions to Build Protective Factors and Measuring Protective Factor Outcomes

During FY 2010-2011the year three and year one CBCAP sites agreed to begin to explicitly identified the interventions that they are using to build family/child “protective factors” and using standardized measures (Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAPI, Parenting Stress Index (PSI), Adult-Adolescent Parenting Inventory-2 (AAPI), Dunst Family Support scale (DFSS), and Dunst Family Resource Scale (DFRS)) to gather data and document the CBCAPs’ outcomes in building “family/Child protective factors” -- parental resilience, social connections, knowledge of parenting and child development, support in times of need, and social and emotional competence of children. The use of the addition monitoring tools (will begin in FY 2011-2012. The four CBCAP sites identified the following interventions to build family/Child protective factors.

Parental Resilience

  • Project CARE – use strength-based approach to empower families to engage in developing their service plan, through the provider network help them strengthen protective factors in areas such as lifestyles and interactions with others (relationships), but also factors such as income and social status, education, employment, and working conditions, access to appropriate services, and the physical environments.
  • Lower Bootheel CBCAP – Provide Parenting classes (e.g., coping & problem solving, planning process, connection with resources).
  • Barceda Family TEAMS – Conduct and encourage participation in Strengthening Families Parenting classes and providing therapy sessions for parent and child when appropriate.
  • Project COPE – Help parents get mental health services when they need it and work closely with parents to boost their confidence and help them deal with key stressors in their lives.

Social Connections

  • Project CARE – Family Advisory Board (FAB) will meet at least 8 meetings each year. FAB will be involved in identifying, planning, and implementing family social activities. FAB will implement at least 4 family social activities per year.
  • Lower Bootheel CBCAP – Parent involvement in Family Advisory Council and encourage volunteerism and community involvement, connect with faith-based organization, involvement in Head Start family activities, enroll in Family Nutrition Education Program, PAT, BHS, EHR, BB home visitation.
  • Barceda Family TEAMS – Encourage parents to develop supportive, positive friendships with other parent during the 14 week Strengthening Families Parenting sessions and Project TEAMS Advisory Council to empower families and build supportive relationships.
  • Project COPE – Quarterly Family Advisory Council meetings offer opportunities to socialize and network with other Project COPE parents. Project COPE also provides opportunities for parents and children to socialize in the community with a list of available activities through the newsletter. For example, Family Enrichment and Resource program offers events free to Project COPE families. There is a new Grandparents Raising Grandchildren support group and multiple support groups for specific disabilities.

Knowledge of Parenting and Child Development

  • Project CARE -- Parent education classes and parenting skills training, a selection of which are offered by five agencies on the Provider Network. All of the classes teach information about developmental stages, developmental markers, positive parenting techniques, alternative discipline, and resolving problem behaviors. Home visitation programs, such as Early Head Start, Parents As Teachers, and Wings, provide in-home family educators who assess infants and children and work with parents to help them learn necessary child development information and how to see the relationship world through the eyes of the child.
  • Lower Bootheel CBCAP – Encourage family enroll in Family Nutrition Education Program, PAT, BHS, EHR, BB home visitation and Love & Logic and Darkness to Light seminars.
  • Barceda Families TEAMS – Conducting home visits that include appropriate family specific parenting and child development education and Strengthening Families training, and education materials.
  • Project COPE – strengthens parenting practices by reinforcing positive parent-child interaction, offering resources, and presenting education on parenting and early childhood development at home visits and quarterly Family Advisory Council meetings.

Support in Times of Need

  • Project CARE -- families can access diapers, wipes, pull-ups, infant and adult hygiene products (soap, shampoo, tooth paste), laundry detergent and dish soap once a month as needed. Exceptions are made in frequency of access for unusual circumstances (job loss, relationship end, etc). Project CARE provider network agencies—Wings, Parents As Teachers, Stay At Home Mothers program, also provides diapers and infant care vouchers. Project CARE also provides transportation assistance via the client services funds. Clients may request and receive a $20 or $25 gas voucher twice a month. We also provide trolley passes for client families who are willing and able to ride the Joplin trolley. Early Head Start and Parts As Teachers provides taxi and trolley passes for enrolled families for social and educational opportunities as well as certain types of appointments. Provider network agencies – Crosslines, the Salvation Army, St. Paul’s United Methodist Church, and Watered Gardens provide food, clothing, and other household items. The lead agent/family support team collaboration model connects parents to other provider network services as needed.
  • Lower Bootheel CBCAP -- Leverage provider network (e.g., Virgie’s Place [clothing, food, diapers, etc.], MO Career Center [employment search], GED classes, Family Counseling Center, County Health Center, Day of Hope, Family Service Division, and Respite care, etc.).
  • Barceda Families TEAMS – Leverage provider network (e.g., budgeting education and worksheets, appropriate Provider Network support services to meet family needs) and flex-pool as payer-of-support-of last-resort.
  • Project COPE – The provider network connects families with community resources and social services consistent with CBCAP family goals and needs. Referrals are made to local food pantries, thrift stores, free events, etc. for needed items. Project COPE supports families in crisis through referrals or flex-pool funding as appropriate.

Social and Emotional Competence of Children

  • Project CARE –Referrals to agencies and programs that assess and teach social skills and emotional skills, especially for children with challenging behaviors. In Jasper and Newton Counties, these are: Head Start, Early Head Start, Parents As Teachers, Wings, Conscious Discipline, play therapy (which allows children to express themselves in ways other than words), and Ozark Center’s PCIT, a component of which helps children learn to express their social and emotional needs appropriately.   Parent classes and parenting skills training that focus on the parent-child relationship and teach parents active listening, how to help children tell their parent about how they feel and what they need, and how parents can be more responsive to their children’ needs. These are classes and trainings such as the previously referenced CPRT, PCIT, Love and Logic, and Conscious Discipline. Ensuring that all who interact with our children are trained to be alert for and recognize the warning signs and symptoms of child abuse/neglect and empowering them to intervene appropriately at the earliest moment possible. Via HOPE Conference and other professional training venues, we offer trainings in: Mandatory Reporting, Signs and Symptoms of Child Abuse and Neglect, Strengthening Families, Stewards of Children: Child Sexual Abuse Prevention, Internet Safety and Electronic Crimes Against Children, Breaking the Cycle of Violence.
  • Lower Bootheel CBCAP – Leverage provider network to educate parents on child development and parenting (e.g., encourage parents to participate in PAT, BHS, EHR, BB home visitation, enroll in Head Start, and include children in activities such as prevention play, Family Support Project holiday party and spring family day.
  • Barceda Families TEAMS – Leverage provider network (e.g., Strengthening Families Parenting classes, home visits that include age appropriate family specific parenting and child social and emotion development education).
  •  Project Cope – Observation of children in daycare, school classroom, or home by behavior or inclusion specialist as needed. Leverage provider network to provide services to develop social and emotional competence of children (e.g., Comtrea or other mental health professionals & counselors, educate parents on importance of developing social-emotional skills of children (specify provider or program?), enroll children with special needs to early intervention programs (i.e. First Steps, P.A.T.), educate/support parents of children with special needs/challenging behavior to reduce stress, and collaborate with ECCS to raise awareness of children’s mental health.